Financial Times to introduce micropayments

As reported by the Independent, the FT is introducing micropayments, only a day after Rupert Murdoch’s NewsCorp announced plans to charge for all its news websites within a year:

FT executives, who hope to have the system in place by 2010, have not settled on the price for an individual story, but say that they have been impressed by the “fabulous buying experience” of iTunes, which allows users to buy a single song for 79p.

Rob Grimshaw, the managing director of FT.com, said that Apple’s impact on the music download culture was inspiring for news publishers: “iTunes is a great one to talk about because fundamentally they have created a fabulous buying experience. I’m a great believer that people don’t object to buying things online.

Mr Grimshaw said publishers had misunderstood the internet: “The demand for information is larger than it has ever been but for some reason the publishing industry as a whole decided it might be a good idea if they all gave away their primary product. It does not strike me as being a smart decision. There seems to be this belief abroad that the whole mechanics of human nature and economics have changed utterly on the internet and I simply don’t believe that’s the case. If you need a piece of information or an article and the only way you can get to it is to pay for it, then people will pay… they do object to hassle. If you create an experience that’s so quick and easy it involves pressing one button, you will find a lot of people are happy to do it.”

This plan would of course, complement the Financial Times’ pre-exisiting subscription method, which offers buiness and financial information essential to many companies. It seems unlikely that the FT thought this up in a day after Murdoch announced it, but could more papers be tempted to consider charging for content now that NewsCorp are planning to? Could they afford to wait to see if the business model works, a time which could be well over two years away?

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